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Standing for the Pledge of Alliegance

+Two+students+are+standing+and+saying+the+Pledge+of+Allegiance+during+class.+Although+many+students+stand+during+the+daily+pledge%2C+there+is+no+rule+enforcing+them+to+say+it.+Each+student+has+the+option+to+either+stand+or+sit%2C+say+or+not+say%2C+but+many+consider+it+common+courtesy+to+stand+regardless.+Photo+by+Dylan+Robinson
 Two students are standing and saying the Pledge of Allegiance during class. Although many students stand during the daily pledge, there is no rule enforcing them to say it. Each student has the option to either stand or sit, say or not say, but many consider it common courtesy to stand regardless. Photo by Dylan Robinson

Two students are standing and saying the Pledge of Allegiance during class. Although many students stand during the daily pledge, there is no rule enforcing them to say it. Each student has the option to either stand or sit, say or not say, but many consider it common courtesy to stand regardless. Photo by Dylan Robinson

Two students are standing and saying the Pledge of Allegiance during class. Although many students stand during the daily pledge, there is no rule enforcing them to say it. Each student has the option to either stand or sit, say or not say, but many consider it common courtesy to stand regardless. Photo by Dylan Robinson

Alyssa Mitchell and Dalton Flores

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Trends of individuals kneeling during the National Anthem and sitting during the Pledge of Allegiance to make a political statement has been taking hold across the nation and is wronging our country.

Students at SJHHS and nationwide are reluctant to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance, claiming that it is discriminatory against their race or religion. Standing for the Pledge of Allegiance is a sign of honor and respect to America.

Rising from your seat shows respect for the soldiers who sacrificed their lives to give citizens the privilege to be able to say the Pledge. Not standing to say the Pledge disregards the people who died for our country. Every day, men and women willingly serve in the United States military to protect the rights and freedoms of US citizens, and standing for the Pledge shows this respect.

Some students are offended by the part of the Pledge which states, “…one nation, under God, indivisible, for liberty and justice for all.” Students whose religion is not monotheistic may find it offensive reciting that their nation is “under God.” However, our forefathers were monotheists and most were Christian.

It is encouraged to those who are offended by the Pledge, to stand and remain for the fallen protectors of our beloved country. To neglect showing respect to these men and women should never even be thought of by an American who has been given the gift of freedom.

Everyone in America has to right to petition and the right of free speech, so technically, no student is required to stand or say the Pledge. Despite legal fact, everyone should still stand to uphold patriotism and respect for their country.

Remaining seated during the Pledge makes a statement for a particular movement. For example, those participating in the Black Lives Matter may remain seated. However, sitting for protest could disrupt other protest movements to act.

There are better ways to protest something one believes is unjust, but there is no need to disrespect the men and women who risk their lives to defend everyone’s freedoms. One way one could protest while still being respectful is to write a formal complaint letter to the administration voicing one’s experiences. Also, one could gather some people who have the same complaints and further discuss how this can be resolved.

Instead of sitting for the Pledge, one could stand and not recite it. Students and adults alike should remain respectful by standing but can add personal protest by remaining silent.  

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1 Comment

One Response to “Standing for the Pledge of Alliegance”

  1. Charlotte on January 24th, 2017 1:08 PM

    I agree with these young people. I’m a grandparent and I’ve always stood for the Pledge of Allegiance. When I was in school, we all stood and we all pledged and then we all said the Lord’s prayer. Now you don’t even have to believe these things and are able to express so. It is the men and women in the military who fight to protect the freedom to protest and to speak your mind. At least show them the common courtesy of RESPECT. If you have no allegiance to this country, why not move where they are more in line with your views?

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