Campus Supervisors Talk Campus Culture

Feature+editor+Nikki+Iyer+virtually+chats+with+campus+supervisors+Earl+Pagal%2C+Adrianna+Lopez%2C+and+Kim+Jenson+about+their+roles+on+campus+during+COVID-19+in-person+learning.

Bill Kaiser

Feature editor Nikki Iyer virtually chats with campus supervisors Earl Pagal, Adrianna Lopez, and Kim Jenson about their roles on campus during COVID-19 in-person learning.

Nikki Iyer, Feature Editor

Campus supervisors have played a huge part in maintaining the COVID-19 restrictions on campus, while also caring for each student. Their roles on campus have significantly shifted from the norm, as instead of only observing over campus, they now enforce COVID-19 guidelines as well.

“Our roles have changed from kind of just standing back and supervising to being more involved with keeping students apart. So there’s a lot more reminding of ‘please adjust your mask’ or ‘remember to social distance’. I think we all try to make it a positive exchange because sometimes we [campus supervisors] have talked with each other that it feels like our role is a little more negative now,” said SJH campus supervisor of 14 years and counting, Kim Jensen. 

“I think now we are a little bit more caregivers as opposed to campus supervisors before COVID. So now we kind of encourage them and give them positive encouragement, especially the ones that are actually social distancing, and are doing the right thing, we encourage them and tell them, ‘hey good job’ because they like to hear that,” said campus supervisor Earl Pagal. “Friends will kind of congregate like magnets, but we have to demagnetize them.”

Not only have the roles of campus supervisors changed, but so has general campus culture at SJHHS. Pre-pandemic, this time of year was celebrated with Battle of the Bands, Winter Formal, and the upcoming Clash of the Classes.

Our roles have changed from kind of just standing back and supervising to being more involved with keeping students apart. So there’s a lot more reminding of ‘please adjust your mask’ or ‘remember to social distance’. I think we all try to make it a positive exchange because sometimes we [campus supervisors] have talked with each other that it feels like our role is a little more negative now”

— Jensen

“Well, it is different. But I don’t want to make it sound like it’s a bad different, I mean it is different because we don’t have the pep rallies. But I’m still seeing spirit in the kids with the athletics, they’re still coming on to practice,” said Jensen. “So, you know we’re missing the pep rallies, we’re missing some of the events we have in the quad, you know club rush and stuff, but it’s also interesting to see how everyone is adapting to doing things differently, and having virtual plays. So, the spirit is still there, it’s just a little more subdued because there’s not as much going on but I think everyone is trying to keep the spirit there, and keep our school as what it’s known for, riding for the brand.”

As life continues under a pandemic, students are adapting to the new conditions, and making the most of a substandard school year. Students continue to keep the spirit alive at SJHHS with the activities they participate in every day.

“Before COVID, there would be bands out there playing in the quad, they would have games and things like that, but with COVID they still do a minimized version of it. They will bring the speakers out there for people that want to sit in the quad. I believe they also had a pumpkin carving contest social distancing so we try to make it a fun atmosphere without violating the CDC guidelines,” said Pagal.

Even supervisors can relate to the sadness associated with missing typical school activities like dances and football games.

“I miss the activities. I really do. I miss the pep rallies, the club rush. I miss all of the activities that usually go on… I’m reliving my high school here at San Juan hills and I love a good pep rally,” said Jensen.

Like many families did, campus supervisors originally felt nervous to return to campus under the pandemic. Many had doubts, but once seeing the responsible way students handled the situation, the supervisors felt much more comfortable.

For instance, Jensen’s husband falls in the age bracket at a higher risk to COVID-19. She originally hesitated to return due to her husband’s health, but felt at ease once she saw how the guidelines were being followed on campus. 

“Once I got here, and saw how everything was being handled and we were trained in what to do. I’m not scared about being here. I have no fear about being here at all,” said Jensen.

Most in-person students do their best to follow the guidelines at school, and the supervisors believe they have been receptive to reminders about wearing a mask and to distance.

I came here because I enjoy being around kids and I enjoy helping them. As long as there are students here, I’m happy… We encourage them to be here, we encourage them academically, and impart some life lessons about how they should succeed”

— Pagal

“Mostly it’s not a case of them being defiant, mostly it has been a case of them forgetting, where sometimes it will drop before the nose. In my experience I have to say the kids have been very receptive to us reminding them and very responsive when we do,” said Jensen. 

As the second semester continues online, it has become increasingly difficult to tolerate COVID-19, as guidelines prohibit students from going to school and daily activities. Supervisors are on campus everyday not only to look after the school, but also to provide encouragement to students.

“Hang in there, it’s going to change, it’s going to get back to where you can knuckle bump and elbow bump and high five and share things on the phone and share food but be patient with us as we are trying to be patient with you guys,” said Jensen.

“I came here because I enjoy being around kids and I enjoy helping them. As long as there are students here, I’m happy… We encourage them to be here, we encourage them academically, and impart some life lessons about how they should succeed,” said Pagal.