Teacher by Day, Actress by Night

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Teacher by Day, Actress by Night

Emily Price acts as Marmee in the play, Little Women, accompanied by her colleague, Jo, at the Costa Mesa Playhouse.

Emily Price acts as Marmee in the play, Little Women, accompanied by her colleague, Jo, at the Costa Mesa Playhouse.

Photo courtesy of Emily Price

Emily Price acts as Marmee in the play, Little Women, accompanied by her colleague, Jo, at the Costa Mesa Playhouse.

Photo courtesy of Emily Price

Photo courtesy of Emily Price

Emily Price acts as Marmee in the play, Little Women, accompanied by her colleague, Jo, at the Costa Mesa Playhouse.

Claire Cone, Copy Editor

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A talented actress hides within the faculty at SJHHS.

Emily Price, an AP environmental science and biology teacher, lives a double life; as she is a high school teacher by day, and an actress in the evening.

A former choir student, Price never expected to utilize her voice as a tool for acting. Little did she know, a friend’s suggestion to become involved in theatre would soon blossom her acting career in 1997.

After auditioning out of good fun at the Elizabeth Howard Curtain Call dinner theatre in Tustin, to her surprise, she landed a role. As an inexperienced actress, this was an impressive achievement.

“I didn’t understand what this really meant or know how hard people worked to get parts. It was really a fluke that I got in,” Price says.

At the first rehearsal, she became intimidated by the earnestness of her colleagues. “My first show was a paying show, which was very unusual coming from someone with no experience. I started studying theatre more. It inspired me to audition for more shows,” Price says.

Staff and students are usually very surprised to hear that I do theatre, as well as people I act with are surprised that I am a science teacher. You can definitely do both.”

— Emily Price

Price took multiple dance and theatre classes at Saddleback College. She learned most from intently observing other actors to reflect and improve her own thespianism.

“I had the chance to work with some professionals early on who had been in the industry for a long time. I would wonder what these people would do to be so great at performing. I really absorbed what others were doing which continued to inspire me,” Price says.

Price’s current role is dramatic and serious; which is very different than her usual comedic role.

“I liked it. I had a lot of fun playing those [comedic] types of roles. I found that it was really hard for an actor who had more dramatic roles to transition to a comedic one. But it came easy to those who had comedic roles and switched to a more dramatic role. Playing a comedic character is difficult because it is all about timing,” said Price.

Price is currently performing her first lead role as Francesca Johnson in the play, The Bridges of Madison County.

“This part is more serious because Francesca is a very layered, complex character,” says Price. She notes that she is volunteering for this play and does acting for herself. It is her passion,other than teaching students biology and environmental science.

“I don’t like the idea of making my passion my paycheck because it kills the joy,” Price says.

She feels as though this is a great role for her to experience. One of her inspirations, Meryl Streep, played the same role as her in the movie-turned version of the play.

I don’t like the idea of making my passion my paycheck because it kills the joy.”

— Emily Price

Price said, “Streep is multifaceted and personalizes and embodies every character she plays.”

One of Price’s favorite roles was playing Adelaide in Guys and Dolls.

“In some ways, she fits me as a person. I loved playing this part,” Price says.

She enjoys making every part she plays her own and enhancing aspects of her own personality instead of imitating other actors’ techniques.

“My teaching career and acting are very similar. I think of myself as if I am on stage every day at school teaching students, as well as acting. Staff and students are usually very surprised to hear that I do theatre, as well as people I act with are surprised that I am a science teacher. You can definitely do both.” Price says.

Price mentioned that she loves musicals because they convey a deeper message through music that words lack to communicate. She believes these productions have the power to move people.

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