Student Takes First Dose of Corona Vaccine

Senior+Anna+Carlson+recently+received+her+first+dose+of+the+Pfizer+COVID-19+vaccine.+As+a+server+at+the+Heritage+Point+living+facility%2C+she+took+the+vaccination+to+keep+the+residents+and+her+family+safe.

Photo courtesy of Anna Carlson

Senior Anna Carlson recently received her first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. As a server at the Heritage Point living facility, she took the vaccination to keep the residents and her family safe.

Nikki Iyer, Feature Editor

Senior Anna Carlson recently took her first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. As a server in the assisted living and memory care facility Heritage Point, she took the vaccination to keep the residents, her family, and herself safe. 

“I’ve been a lot stricter with myself about going out and wearing my mask because I don’t want to bring [COVID-19] to them because they are all so high-risk. Some staff started testing positive back in October, and we started having a mini outbreak so I re-quarantined all of October through December. Over break I didn’t go anywhere except for work,” said Carlson. Currently, Carlson is an all-online student, as she says staying home will keep those around her healthy.

Carlson received the vaccine at Heritage Point, where they set up a vaccination station for residents and staff. After getting the shot, patients would wait for fifteen minutes in the dining hall so healthcare workers could monitor potential side effects or allergic reactions.

“The shot itself was the least painful shot I’ve ever had. I barely felt the needle go in. Normally I’m a wimp about shots and just getting the poke hurts.” said Carlson. 

Carlson received the vaccine on Monday, January 25th. Besides soreness and slight congestion in her head, she felt no other side effects.

“The first couple hours after getting the shot my arm wasn’t even sore . . . but then Monday night and all day yesterday my arm kind of hurt, but by today [January 27th] it doesn’t hurt anymore,” said Carlson.

I think the more people we get vaccinated the safer it’s going to become and I personally am not scared of it and I think that it’s going to be okay. Everyone wants things to get back to normal for tons of reasons and everyone is worried about our economy and all that stuff and the easiest way to get back to normal is if people take it. ”

— Carlson

On February 15th, Anna is scheduled to receive her second dose. After receiving her second dose she plans to continue to follow COVID-19 precautions and guidelines, but may ease up on quarantine.

“I never personally was scared of getting COVID because it would get me sick, I was scared of bringing it to other people. Obviously I’m still going to wear my mask and social distance, I think that’s very important after getting the vaccine. But just the fact that all of the residents I work with have gotten the vaccine does make me a little less worried about potentially giving it to them because it might not get them as sick now. So I think I’ll be easier on myself about seeing my friends, but I’m still going to wear my mask, stay outside, stuff like that,” said Carlson. 

While many people have concerns with the COVID-19 vaccination, Carlson would recommend others to take the vaccine, as it is the best way to reduce the risk of the Coronavirus, and get things back to normal.

“Obviously it’s everyone’s choice like if you personally are scared you don’t have to do it but I think it’s a good idea. I think the more people we get vaccinated the safer it’s going to become and I personally am not scared of it and I think that it’s going to be okay. Everyone wants things to get back to normal for tons of reasons and everyone is worried about our economy and all that stuff and the easiest way to get back to normal is if people take it. So if you can I would do it,” said Carlson. “I trust they [the scientists] would not release the shot unless they had any serious concerns about it.”