“See Something, Say Something” to Replace “Text-a-Tip”

Crisis center will monitor tips 24/7 in an effort to prevent youth violence at school sites district wide.

The+new+program+%22See+Something%2C+Say+Something%22+has+a+mobile+app+students+can+use+to+reach+adults.+This+system+will+replace+%22Text-a-Tip%22+which+was+commonly+used+on+campus.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

“See Something, Say Something” to Replace “Text-a-Tip”

The new program

The new program "See Something, Say Something" has a mobile app students can use to reach adults. This system will replace "Text-a-Tip" which was commonly used on campus.

Rylan Weber

The new program "See Something, Say Something" has a mobile app students can use to reach adults. This system will replace "Text-a-Tip" which was commonly used on campus.

Rylan Weber

Rylan Weber

The new program "See Something, Say Something" has a mobile app students can use to reach adults. This system will replace "Text-a-Tip" which was commonly used on campus.

Kaitlyn Kittredge, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






A new program in the district, “Say Something Anonymous Reporting System” is replacing the previous “Text-A-Tip.” Both programs promote providing support and mental assistance to students easily and anonymously. 

The new system enables students and adults to submit concerns to help identify and intervene upon at-risk individuals before they hurt themselves or others. 

To report something to this program, students can send an anonymous tip through the website, app, or by phone. It is open 24/7 and when sent, the tip is reviewed by a crisis center. After being reviewed, the tip is sent to law enforcement and/or school administrations for intervention. This is one of the major differences between this new program and the previous one, “Text-A-Tip”. 

“Text-A-Tip” was a program that sent anonymous messages straight to head representatives at the school instead of a center. This means that students would need to rely on busy adults seeing their texts rather than knowing they always have access to help. 

“The new program is going to be monitored 24/7 by a crisis center. This will provide the extra level of support for those kids struggling at 2 a.m. trying to reach help and get it immediately instead of all the administrators being in bed and risking not seeing it till the next morning when it may be too late,” said Assistant Principal, Darrin Jindra. 

I’m excited for the additional layer of mental health support for our kids because I think that’s one of the bigger things needed to prevent a catastrophe from happening”

— Darrin Jindra

The new system comes from a youth violence prevention program from Sandy Hook Promise (SHP). SHP is a national, nonprofit organization led by several family members whose loved ones were killed in the mass shooting at Sandy Hook on December 14, 2012. 

Their main focus is based around preventing gun violence and other forms of victimization by educating others on getting help for individuals who may be at risk of hurting themselves or others.

“I’m excited for the additional layer of mental health support for our kids because I think that’s one of the bigger things needed to prevent a catastrophe from happening,” said Jindra. 

Through the delivery of four different “Know the Signs” prevention programs including relationship skills, social awareness, responsible decision-making, and self-awareness, millions of youth and adults have reported possible victims of different obstacles. Some of the different challenges reported deal with suicide, gun violence, school shootings, bullying, and other violent threats.

Because everything sent is anonymous, administrators hope students will feel better about sharing different situations because their name isn’t attached to the problem. 

On Friday, November 22, all students and staff members will be viewing a thirty minute video introducing “See Something, Say Something” during their third period tutorial time. It will show what it is, how to sign up for a spot, and how to get the mobile app. Because every message goes to the crisis center, the district is hoping that students will take it more seriously and use it for the better. 

The original date was delayed so that training and procedural information could be coordinated with the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. SSARS will now be working with both CUSD and OCSD.

“That level of support for some kids that want to say something, but don’t know how, is going to be huge,” said Jindra. 

This “Say Something Anonymous Reporting System” will be implemented in the district to take action on reaching kids that need help access to them at all times. The new program is a reminder for students to use their voices and be heard.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email